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Date Archives: June 2020

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June
30

Days on Market Drops to 22 Days – A New Record

The market outlook remains positive going into the summer despite the coronavirus. According to realtor.com®'s latest Weekly Housing Recovery Index, which hit 92 points for the week ending June 20, we are just 8 points short of the pre-COVID baseline.

 

One of the biggest improvements this week? Days on market—homes are currently selling three days faster than ever.   Zillow also reports a rebound, with homes on the market for 22 days—the fastest pace since June 2018, according to a recent analysis. While there has been an inventory crunch, Zillow reports that new listings are up 14 percent month-over-month.

"Buyers shopping today might expect to be welcomed by desperate sellers, but they'll instead discover houses selling like hotcakes in the speediest market in recent memory," said Zillow economist Jeff Tucker. "The market did slow down in April, but anyone shopping this summer needs to be prepared to keep up with the lightning-quick pace of sales today. The question is whether the tempo will slow after buyers finish playing catch-up from planned spring moves, or if this fast-paced market will stay hot thanks to continued low interest rates and buyers scrambling over record-low summer inventory."

  • RISMedia, June 27, 2020
June
29

Think You Should For Sale By Owner? Think Again

Think You Should For Sale By Owner? Think Again [INFOGRAPHIC] | MyKCM

Some Highlights 

  • For Sale By Owner (FSBO) is the process of selling real estate without the representation of a real estate broker or real estate agent.
  • According to the National Association of Realtors' Profile of Home Buyers & Sellers, 35% of homeowners who decided to FSBO last year did so to avoid paying a commission or fee. But, homes sold with an agent net 6% more than those sold as a FSBO according to Collateral Analytics.
  • Before you decide to take on the challenge of selling your house on your own, connect with your RE/MAX DFW Associates agent to discuss options.

-Keeping Current Matters - June 2020

June
28

Kitchen Remodeling Decisions You'll Never Regret!

We see lots of kitchen trends at HouseLogic, so we know it's easy to get swept along with what's in vogue, only to get bummed out by your faddish design choices a few years later. Thank you -- and damn you -- Pinterest.

But chances are you're only going to remodel your current kitchen once. After all, a complete kitchen renovation has a national median cost of $60,000, according to the "Remodeling Impact Report" from the National Association of REALTORS®. With that much on the line, you want to make all the right moves. If you do, you could recover about 62% of your investment if you sell.

So we're here to future-proof you from angst by naming the seven definitive kitchen features that will retain their beauty, marketability, and value — all while giving you lasting enjoyment.

#1: White is the Dominant Color

Bottom line: White is the most marketable color. You'll always find it atop the National Kitchen and Bath Association's annual survey of most popular kitchen colors. It simply doesn't go out of style.

  • Throughout history, it's been associated with happiness, purity (think Snow White), and new beginnings.
  • It's a bright color that reflects light and makes even small kitchens feel larger.
  • It's a neatnik's dream — dirt has no place to hide.

Even better, it's uber-tolerant of both your budget and taste: A standard color for any manufacturer, you'll find white cabinets, tile, counters, faucets, sinks, and appliances at any price point.

And with a white backdrop, you can be as conservative or expressive as you want. After all, it's about your enjoyment, not just dollars and cents. For example:

  • Add your personal touch with colored glass knobs and pulls.
  • Show off antique Fiesta ware on open shelves or in upper cabinets with glass fronts.
  • Paint walls the color du jour — even off-white!

Heck, with a white palette, you can change your mind about paint color on a whim. Those all-white basics will make any hue you choose look fresh and contemporary.

#2: Hardwood for Flooring

It's been our foot fetish for years. That's especially true ever since hardwood flooring was mass-produced during the Industrial Revolution, making beautiful flooring readily available at a reasonable cost.

Today, more than half of home buyers who purchased a home without hardwood floors say they would have paid an extra $2,080 for them, according to the "Home Features Survey" from the National Association of REALTORS®. And among buyers of any age, upwards of 80% say hardwood floors are "somewhat" or "very important."

"It's the one feature men and women agree on," says Debe Robinson, NKBA treasurer and owner of Kitchen Expressions Inc. in Sheffield, Ala., who's also worked in the flooring industry. 

Why? The love of wood is in our genes. Our nesting instincts know that hardwood has warmth, personality, and makes our homes cozy and inviting. That's why this clever chameleon pairs well with any kitchen style — from casual cottage and sleek contemporary to the most chi-chi Park Avenue traditional. 

More reasons why wood flooring is the goof-proof option:

Perfect for open floor plans. It flows beautifully from the kitchen into adjoining rooms.

It's tough. Hardwoods such as oak, ash, and maple will shrug off your kitchen's high-traffic punishment for years. Solid hardwood flooring can be refinished 10 to 12 times during it's typical 100-year lifespan.

It's eco-friendly. Hardwood is considered a green building material when it's certified by the Forest Stewardship Council and comes from sustainably managed forests.

RelatedThe Best Choices for Kitchen Flooring

#3: Shaker Style for Cabinets

Thank heaven for the Shakers. While they were busy reducing life to its essentials, they made cabinets with clean, simple lines that will forever be in style. 

Shaker cabinets are an enduring legacy of American style and, like wood flooring, have the knack for looking good in any setting. Their simple frame-and-panel design helps reduce the amount of busyness in a kitchen, making it a soothing, friendly place to be.

"In a kitchen with a timeless look, you want the cabinets to be part of the backdrop," says Alan Zielinski, a former president of the National Kitchen and Bath Association. "You don't want to be overpowered. You're looking for plain, simple, clean lines."

Those plain, simple, clean lines are a perfect fit for transitional style — a beautiful combo of traditional and contemporary styles. In fact, the National Kitchen and Bath Association says that after creeping up on traditional for years, transitional is now the most popular kitchen style.

As our families grow more diverse, transitional style will only get more popular. It lets us personalize and blend cultural influences — Latin, Asian, Mideastern — into our homes; it's the perfect balance of old and new, just like Shaker-style cabinets.

RelatedHow to Choose Kitchen Cabinets for the Best Value

#4: Carrara Marble for Countertops

 

Carrara marble is a timeless classic that's been used in homes for thousands of years. (Michelangelo's "David" was carved from Carrara.) It'll look as good in the next millennium as it does now.

Here's why:

  • Carrara's lacy graining and subtle white colors look terrific in a white kitchen (or any kitchen, for that matter).
  • It has a whiteness you won't find in other natural stones.
  • It's readily available, making it less expensive than other high-end choices, such as quartz.
  • It'll last for generations.

If you Google it, you'll find a lot of debate about it (and marble in general) because it stains easily. But if you want something truly timeless, Carrara is the answer. And with today's sealants, the problem of staining is almost moot if you reseal once or twice a year.

RelatedHow to Get the Look of Marble Without the Cost

Still not sold? Or don't have the budget? Laminate countertops are relatively inexpensive and can be upgraded to stone when you do have the budget.

#5: Subway Tile for the Backsplash

 

Subway tile goes back to the early 1900s, when it was used to line New York's first subway tunnels. Classic subway tiles are white, 3-inch-by-6-inch rectangles — a look that became popular in American kitchens and baths, and has stuck around ever since. Now it's an iconic part of the American design vernacular, destined never to go out of style. 

In the kitchen, ceramic tile excels as a backsplash, where it guards against moisture, is a snap to clean, lasts forever, and always looks classy. 

Sure, a backsplash can be an opportunity for a blast of color and pattern, but neutrals will always be current and blend with any look. Plus, a subway tile backsplash and a marble countertop make a dashing couple that will stand the test of time.

To make it even more enduring, keep it achromatic and camouflage dirt with gray or beige grout.

#6: Ergonomic Design

Adaptability and universal design features mean easy living at any age. A recent survey on kitchens from the American Institute of Architects points to the growing popularity of smart ergonomic design, a sign that kitchen adaptability will stay in vogue. 

Smart ergonomics simply mean convenience — for young or old, party people or homebodies — a key factor when remodeling a kitchen that will function well, retain its value, and always feel right.

No matter you or your buyer's current or future needs, everyone wins with these approaches:

Create different countertop heights. Standard height is 36 inches, but you can raise or lower sections of cabinets by altering the height of the base. Add color-match shim strips to the bases of countertops that don't include sinks or appliances. You (or a new owner) can easily remove them or add to them to adjust the height.

Swap a standard range for a wall oven and a cooktop. Ranges have fixed heights. There's no getting around the fact you have to bend to access the oven. But a wall oven conveniently installs about waist-high.

Add pull-out shelves to base cabinets. Lower cabinets with doors mean having to twist like a pretzel to see what's inside. Pull-out shelves put everything at your fingertips.

Keep wide clearances. Kitchens attract people, and with open floor plans, you're apt to have folks hunting for snacks, helping you cook, or just hanging out while you prep meals. Keep traffic flowing with a minimum of 42 inches between counters and islands.

Related: 5 Kitchen Layout Ideas to Avoid

#7: Smart Storage

Today's families store about 47% of their kitchen stuff outside the kitchen — in laundry rooms, basements, even sheds — according to data released at the 2013 Kitchen and Bath Industry Show.

We blame it on the fact that kitchens have evolved from a tucked-away place at the back of the house into a multiple-chef, multi-tasking space that's the hub of family life. Plus, our love of open kitchens and stocking up at warehouse stores means less wall space and more stuff, kitchen design expert Robinson says.

The solution: smart storage. Cabinet manufacturers have you covered with nearly unlimited storage options -- shelves and compartments that unfold, turn, extend, and slide.

But it's not just about having storage, it's about designing it smartly. Follow these guidelines to make your storage timeless:

Create a primary storage zone. This is an area 30 to 60 inches high and within two feet on either side of your body. Store your most-used items here -- your favorite work knives, measuring cups, salt and pepper for cooking, your trusty pots and pans. With one easy motion, you can grab what you use all the time.

Plan for the unknown. A truly timeless kitchen anticipates and adapts to future needs, such as:

  • A space that can easily convert to an office, wine storage, or a closet.
  • Lower cabinet spaces that can accommodate a wine cooler, under-counter refrigerator, a second dishwasher, or new must-have kitchen appliances on the horizon. (Remember when microwaves didn't exist?)
  • An open space that fits a freestanding desk or favorite antique that can personalize the kitchen — no matter who owns the home.

-Houselogic - June 2020

June
27

How Long Does It Take to Buy a House?

How long does it take to buy a house? A lot depends on how much time you spend shopping for one. But once you have a contract, it takes an average of 50 days to close on a house.

There are a lot of steps to buying a house, and any of them could drag out the timeline, especially if you're not prepared. Here's the home-buying timeline, broken down step-by-step, so you can be in control:

1. Do Your Homework

Time: 1-14 days

Dreaming about owning your own home is one thing; making it happen is another. To get beyond the dream stage, you need to do some critical research to help you figure out what you  — along with how much can you afford. 

It's mighty disappointing to fall in love with a house only to find out you can't afford it. A quick chat with your bank can help you avoid that heartbreak — it's called pre-qualifying. But it's no guarantee you'll get a mortgage (that comes later), only an indication of how much you can afford.

2. Find An Agent

Time: 1-7 days

Finding an agent who suits you is key to the home buying process. They should be your most trusted adviser. Look for one with intimate knowledge of your desired community. If they know the inside scoop, they'll know a great deal (or a bum one) when they see it.

3. Get Pre-Approved for a Loan

Time: 5-8 business days

Getting pre-approved for a loan signals you're a serious buyer. Most agents recommend you have a pre-approval in hand before you make an offer, and they can offer recommendations for lenders. But pre-approval goes deeper than pre-qualification. It needs a ton of documents from you. A couple of tips to help make this a speedier process:

  • Get all your documents for mortgage pre-approval organized and ready to go.
  • Compare rates from lenders within a 14-day window: Credit bureaus will count all their checks as just one. (That's good news for your credit score.)

4. Shop

Time: A few days to a few months

Here's where things really vary. There are so many variables. If you're set on a particular neighborhood where the inventory is low, it could take longer… or you could discover "the one" on day one. It all depends on what you're seeking and what's available. But the typical buyer actively searches for 10 to 12 weeks and looks at a median of 10 homes.

5. Make an Offer, Negotiate, and Sign a Contract

Time: 1-7 days

Work with your agent on price, contingencies, and other terms of the deal. A couple of tips to help make this step proceed smoothly:

  • Include the pre-approval letter from your lender in the offer, and put down earnest money. (Commit 3% to 4% of the sale price instead of the standard 1% to 3%, and you might really put a fire under them.)
  • If you receive a counteroffer, respond ASAP. You don't want to give another buyer time to jump in with a better offer.

Related: Tips for Making an Offer on a House

6. Get Final Mortgage Approval

Time: A few days to 3 weeks

Getting pre-approved for a mortgage doesn't automatically mean you get a loan on the home you have under contract. The lender has a few other requirements once the home is chosen, such as an inspection and appraisal. And they'll want to see even more current copies of your financial documents.

From this point on, the steps to buying a house will often overlap, so you'll have several wheels in motion.

Related: "I Need 20% Down" and Other Myths About Mortgages

7. Get a Home Inspection

Time: 3-7 days to schedule; 2-3 hours to inspect

As soon as your contract is accepted, contact an inspector to get on their books. The inspection itself will only take two or three hours, but unfortunately, they're not quite Amazon. They seldom show up the next day.

However, they can get the report to you quickly. Many inspectors take pictures and fill out the report as they go, then send it to your inbox within hours of completion. But it can take up to a couple of days if they're backed up.

If the inspection turns up issues, it can cause some delays. This can range from a day or two to renegotiate, or longer if, for example, you have an FHA loan that requires certain safety standards. A home with peeling lead paint may need to be repainted, which can take weeks.

Related: A Home Inspection Checklist for Buyers

8. Get a Home Appraisal

Time: Up to 5 days to schedule; a few hours to do the appraisal; up to 5 business days to get the report to the lender

The appraisal is key to getting a mortgage. If the home fails to appraise for the mortgage amount, you may have to put more down or renegotiate the contract. That's why you want to line up an appraiser as soon as you have a house under contract. And unlike the home inspection, this report goes to the lender instead of you and takes longer because the appraiser has to do additional research on what homes are selling for in the area.

9. Get Title Insurance

Time: 1-3 business days for title check; 2 weeks for insurance policy

Your title company will perform the check, which means they'll look at deeds and other documents to make sure you will own the home free and clear of any liens or former claims to the property.

10. Get Homeowners Insurance

Time: Up to 2 weeks

Your insurance company may send someone out to assess the property for potential risks, which can take several days. And your mortgage lender may require other types of coverage, such as flood insurance.

11. Arrange for Closing Funds

Time: A few minutes to a few days

Find out from your agent whether you need to bring a cashier's or certified check or transfer funds digitally. Transfer the funds to the right account, and get your money ready to release.

12. Conduct a Final Walk-Through

Time: 1 hour, the day of or day before closing

This is your chance to make sure the sellers made any agreed-upon repairs and left the property in as good (or better!) condition than the last time you saw it.

13. Close on the House

Time: 50 days on average; 1-2 hours to actually sign the paperwork

Each step after you've got a contract on a home is part of the closing process. And that process —  which includes getting the loan, inspection, appraisal, title, insurance, etc. —  takes the average home buyer about six weeks. 

When it's time for the main event, bring your photo ID, and stretch your hand muscles; you've got a lot of signing to do! But getting the keys? Takes hardly any time at all.

-Houselogic - June 2020

June
26

New Index Reveals Impact of COVID-19 on Real Estate

New Index Reveals Impact of COVID-19 on Real Estate | MyKCM

Earlier this month, realtor.com announced the release of their initial Housing Recovery Index, a weekly guide showing how the pandemic has impacted the residential real estate market. The index leverages a weighted average of four key components of the housing industry, tracking each of the following:

  1. Housing Demand – Growth in online search activity
  2. Home Price – Growth in asking prices
  3. Housing Supply – Growth of new listings
  4. Pace of Sales – Difference in time-on-market

The index then compares the current status "to the last week of January 2020 market trend, as a baseline for pre-COVID market growth. The overall index is set to 100 in this baseline period. The higher a market's index value, the higher its recovery and vice versa."

The graph below charts the index by showing how the real estate market started out strong in early 2020, and then dropped dramatically at the beginning of March when the pandemic paused the economy. It also shows the strength of the recovery since the beginning of May.

New Index Reveals Impact of COVID-19 on Real Estate | MyKCM

It's clear to see that the housing market is showing promising signs of recovery from the deep economic cuts we experienced earlier this spring. As noted by Dean Mon, Chairman of the National Association of Home Builders (NAHB):

"As the nation reopens, housing is well-positioned to lead the economy forward."

The data today indicates the housing market is already on the way up.

 

-Keeping Current Matters - June 26, 2020

June
25

Sales of New Homes in the United States Surged Higher in May as the Economy Reopened.

Sales of new single-family houses rose to a seasonally adjusted annual rate of 676,000, according to estimates released jointly today by the U.S. Census Bureau and the Department of Housing and Urban Development. This is 16.6 percent above the revised April rate of 580,000 and is 12.7 percent above the year-ago level.  Economists had expected a more modest bounce of just 2 percent to a pace of 636,000 from the previously reported 623,000. The actual increase was much steeper because of the downward revision for April and May's sales rate coming in higher than expected.

The huge boost in home sales in May suggests the economy is recovering faster than expected. New home sales are only a small part of the housing market but they can have an outsized economic impact because homebuilding is labor-intensive and buyers typically also purchase a lot of adjacent goods, such as furniture and appliances.  New home sales are reported at contract signings, so these are purchase agreed in May. Sales of previously owned homes reported Monday disappointed expectations but those are May closings on contracts that would have been signed in the prior months.

Together, the data paint a picture of a housing market that suffered a steep decline in activity in March and April but rebounded sharply when the economy reopened.

  • Breitbart News, June 22, 2020
June
24

What Are the Experts Saying About Future Home Prices?

What Are the Experts Saying About Future Home Prices? | MyKCM

A worldwide pandemic and an economic recession have had a tremendous effect on the nation. The uncertainty brought about by both has made predicting consumer behavior nearly impossible. For that reason, forecasting home prices has become extremely difficult.

Normally, there's a simple formula to determine the future price of any item: calculate the supply of that item in ratio to the demand for that item. In housing right now, demand far exceeds supply. Mortgage applications to buy a home just rose to the highest level in 11 years while inventory of homes for sale is at (or near) an all-time low. That would usually indicate strong appreciation for home values as we move throughout the year.

Some experts, however, are not convinced the current rush of purchasers is sustainable. Ralph McLaughlin, Chief Economist at Haus, explained in their June 2020 Hausing Market Forecast why there is concern:

"The upswing that we'll see this summer is a result of pent-up demand from homebuyers and supply-in-progress from homebuilders that has simply been pushed off a few months. However, after this pent-up demand goes away, the true economic scarring due to the pandemic will begin to affect the housing market as the tide of pent-up demand goes out."

The virus and other challenges currently impacting the industry have created a wide range of thoughts regarding the future of home prices. Here's a list of analysts and their projections, from the lowest depreciation to the highest appreciation:

We can garner two important points from this list:

  1. There is no real consensus among the experts.
  2. No one projects prices to crash like they did in 2008.

Bottom Line

Whether you're thinking of buying a home or selling your house, know that home prices will not change dramatically this year, even with all of the uncertainty we've faced in 2020.

 

- Keeping Current Matters - June 23, 2020

June
23

Homebuyers Are in the Mood to Buy Today!

Homebuyers Are in the Mood to Buy Today | MyKCM

According to the latest FreddieMac Quarterly Forecast, mortgage interest rates have fallen to historically low levels this spring and they're projected to remain low. This means there's a huge incentive for buyers who are ready to purchase. And homeowners looking for eager buyers can take advantage of this opportune time to sell as well.

There's a very positive outlook on interest rates going forward, as the projections from the FreddieMac report indicate continued lows into 2021:

"Going forward, we forecast the 30-year fixed-rate mortgage to remain low, falling to a yearly average of 3.4% in 2020 and 3.2% in 2021."

 With mortgage rates hovering at such compelling places, ongoing buyer interest is bound to keep driving the housing market forward. Rates also reached another record low last week, so homebuyers are in what FreddieMac is identifying as the buying mood:

"While the rebound in the economy is uneven, one segment that is exhibiting strength is the housing market. Purchase demand activity is up over twenty percent from a year ago, the highest since January 2009. Mortgage rates have hit another record low due to declining inflationary pressures, putting many homebuyers in the buying mood. However, it will be difficult to sustain the momentum in demand as unsold inventory was at near record lows coming into the pandemic and it has only dropped since then."

There's no doubt that even though buyers are ready to purchase, it's hard for many of them to find a home to buy today. Mortgage rates aren't the only thing hovering near all-time lows; homes available for sale are too. With housing inventory as scarce as it is today – a nearly 20% year-over-year decline in available homes to purchase – keeping buyers in the purchasing mood may be tough if they can't find a home to buy (See graph below):

Homebuyers Are in the Mood to Buy Today | MyKCM

What does this mean for buyers?

Competition is hot with so few homes available for purchase and low mortgage rates are helping to drive affordability as well. Getting pre-approved now will help you gain a competitive advantage and accelerate the homebuying process, so you're ready to go when you find that perfect home you'd like to buy. Working quickly and efficiently with a trusted real estate professional will help put you in a position to act fast when you're ready to make your move.

What does this mean for sellers?

If you're thinking of selling your house, know that the motivation for buyers to purchase right now is as high as ever with rates where they are today. Selling now before other sellers come to market in your neighborhood this summer might put your house high on the list for many buyers. Homebuyers are clearly in the mood to buy, and with today's safety guidelines and precautions in place to show your house, confidence is also on your side.

Bottom Line

Whether you're looking to buy or sell, there's great motivation to be in the housing market, especially with mortgage rates hovering at this historic all-time low. Let's connect today to make sure you're ready to make your move.

-Keeping Current Matters, June 22nd

 

June
20

Is the Economic Recovery Already Underway?

Is the Economic Recovery Already Underway? | MyKCM

The Wall Street Journal just released their latest monthly Survey of Economists. In an article on the findings, they reported:

"The U.S. economy will be in recovery by the third quarter of this year, economists said in a survey that also concluded the labor market will fare better than previously expected following the effects of the coronavirus pandemic."

Clearly, the latest jobs report from the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics confirmed the labor market is outperforming expectations, as it revealed that 2.5 million jobs were added. Directly before the release, experts forecasted that we would lose over 8 million jobs.

A second revelation indicating the economy is already about to turn around was also somewhat unexpected. More than 9 out of 10 economists surveyed believe the recovery has already begun this quarter or will begin in the third quarter. Here are the results of the survey question asking when the recovery will begin:Is the Economic Recovery Already Underway? | MyKCMThe survey also asked what type of recovery the economists expect.

More than 8 out of 10 believe it will be a form of a 'V' recovery:

  • A true 'V' with a sharp drop and a sharp rebound
  • A 'Nike Swoosh' with a sharp drop and a more gradual recovery, coined after the company's logo

Some experts, possibly concerned about a second wave of COVID-19, call for a 'W' recovery – a double dip recession.

Others call for a 'U' with a prolonged bottom.

A very small percentage project the dreaded 'L' recovery, which is no recovery at all for the foreseeable future (think of the Great Recession).

Here's the breakdown:Is the Economic Recovery Already Underway? | MyKCM

Bottom Line

Though we still have a long and difficult journey ahead, it appears the worst for both the economy and the unemployment situation may be in our rearview mirror.

June
19

Three Reasons Homebuyers Are Ready to Purchase This Year

Three Reasons Homebuyers Are Ready to Purchase This Year

Three Reasons Homebuyers Are Ready to Purchase This Year | MyKCM

A recent survey by Lending Tree tapped into behaviors of over 1,000 prospective buyers. The results indicated 53% of all homebuyers are more likely to buy a home in the next year, even amid the current health crisis. The survey further revealed why, naming several reasons buyers are more likely to move this year (see graph below):Three Reasons Homebuyers Are Ready to Purchase This Year | MyKCM

Let's break down why these are a few of the key factors motivating buyers to actively engage in the home search process, and the corresponding wins for sellers as well.

1. Low Mortgage Rates

The biggest reason potential homebuyers indicated they're eager to purchase this year is due to current mortgage rates, which are hovering near all-time lows. Today's low rates are making it more affordable than ever to buy a home, which is a huge incentive for purchasers. In fact, 67% of respondents in the Lending Tree survey want to take advantage of low mortgage rates. This is no surprise when comparing historic mortgage rates by decade (see below):

Three Reasons Homebuyers Are Ready to Purchase This Year | MyKCM

Sam Khater, Chief Economist at Freddie Mac recently said:

"As the economy is slowly rebounding, all signs continue to point to a solid recovery in home sales activity heading into the summer as prospective buyers jump back into the market. Low mortgage rates are a key factor in this recovery."

2. Reduced Spending

Some people have also been able to save a little extra money over the past few months while sheltering in place. One of the upsides of staying home recently is that many have been able to work remotely and minimize extra spending on things like commuting expenses, social events, and more. For those who fall into this category, they may have a bit more saved up for down payments and closing costs, making purchasing a home more feasible today.

3. Re-Evaluating Their Space

Spending time at home has also given buyers a chance to really evaluate their living space, whether renting or as a current homeowner. With time available to craft a wish list of what they really need in their next home, from more square footage to a more spacious neighborhood, they're ready to make it happen.

What does this mean for buyers and sellers?

With these three factors in play, the demand for housing will keep growing this year, especially over the summer as more communities continue their phased approach to reopening. Buyers can take advantage of additional savings and low mortgage rates. And if you're thinking of selling, know that your home may be in high demand as buyer interest grows and the number of homes for sale continues to dwindle. This may be your moment to list your house and make a move into a new space as well.

Bottom Line

If you're ready to buy or sell – or maybe both – let's connect to put your plans in motion. With low mortgage rates leading the way, it's a great time to take advantage of your position in today's market.

  • Keeping Current Matters, June 16, 2020
June
18

Homebuilder Sentiment Posts Biggest Monthly Surge Ever, a Sign Housing is Rebounding from COVID

KEY POINTS

    • * Builder sentiment jumped a striking 21 points in June to 58, the largest monthly increase ever in the National Association of Home Builders/Wells Fargo Housing Market Index.
    • * Any reading above 50 indicates a positive market. In April, it plunged a record 42 points to 30.
    • * Of the index's three components, current sales conditions jumped 21 points to 63. Sales expectations in the next six months rose 22 points to 68. Buyer traffic more than doubled from May to June, from 22 to 43.

A faster than expected turnaround in demand following a sharp drop-off at the start of the coronavirus pandemic, has the nation's homebuilders bullish on their business again.

Builder sentiment jumped a striking 21 points in June to 58, the largest monthly increase ever in the National Association of Home Builders/Wells Fargo Housing Market Index. Any reading above 50 indicates a positive market. In April, it plunged a record 42 points to 30.

"As the nation reopens, housing is well-positioned to lead the economy forward," said NAHB Chairman Dean Mon, a homebuilder and developer from Shrewsbury, New Jersey. "Inventory is tight, mortgage applications are increasing, interest rates are low and confidence is rising."

  • CNBC, June 16, 2020
June
17

OnLine Clicks Have Surged – Buyers Looking!

The number of clicks for Dallas-Fort Worth home searches is searching.   The more than 30% jump in online property views for DFW is more likely another sign that the local housing market is recovering from the worst pandemic, according to experts at Realtor.com.   Nationwide home searches on the top home marketing sites are also up significantly from a year ago.  And while listings remain down, there are growing signs that the home market is bouncing back strongly.   "The general sentiment from consumer surveys is that now is not a good time to sell your home because of COVID, economic uncertainty and social unrest, but the data is saying the opposite," Daniell Hale, chief economist for Realtor.com, said in a statement.  "Home prices are back to their pre-COVID pace, and we're seeing listings spend less time of the market than last week."   The housing market still needs more sellers to meet the surge in demand, she said.  "Looking forward, if we don't get the inventory we need, we'll see prices rise even more and homes sell faster later this summer."

                        • Dallas Morning News, June 15, 2020
June
16

US Housing Shortage Sparks Uptick in Bidding Wars

How dramatic will home recovery sales be in coming months?

As more Americans jump back into the housing market, competition for limited inventory is increasing among prospective homebuyers.  Many major cities around the U.S. experienced an uptick in interest, creating bidding wars for available properties, according to real estate brokerage firm Redfin.  Nearly 50 percent of Redfin offers faced competition in May, up from 43.9 percent in April.  Meanwhile, the number of listings on the market was 18.9 percent lower than the same period last year.  "Bidding wars also jumped in May because homebuyers felt they were starting to get more clarity around where the economy was headed, with cities around the nation lifting stay-at-home orders," Redfin lead economist Taylor Marr said in a statement. "This gave house hunters more confidence to compete."

 

Single-family homes were more likely to have multiple competitive offers when compared with condos and townhouses. As previously reported by FOX Business, the pandemic has caused prospective buyers to value space and private property more than they may have in the past.  Homes priced below $500,000 are in the highest demand, Redfin agents said.  The metro area that experienced the highest amount of competition was Boston, followed by Dallas and Washington, D.C. 

  • Fox Business, June 16, 2020